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LABOR STUDIES CORE COURSES

For a list of courses that count towards the Labor Studies minor, please click HERE. Please keep in mind that students cannot count courses in their major towards a minor degree. The requirements for the Labor Studies minor are listed in the “Academic Programs” link.

Labor Studies

LABR 001. Introduction to Labor Studies (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Through comparative and historical perspective, examines the social forces shaping labor conditions and workers' struggles for justice. Covers the changing nature of work under capitalism, race and gender discrimination in the labor market, the impact of economic globalization, and unions' successes and limitations.

Ethnic Studies

ETST 102. Political Economy of Race and Class (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. This course explores the interrelationships among race, class, ethnicity, and the operation of market processes. Readings for this course will center on the comparative economic well-being of African Americans, Chicanos, Asian Americans, and Native Americans.

History of the Americas

HISA 124. Labor and Working Class History of the United States (4) Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to the history of work, workers and their families, communities, organizations, unions, and workers' organizations in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Attention is paid to gender, race, immigration, and diversity of the work force, and role of government, within an economic and international context.

Sociology

SOC 112. Sociology of the Labor Movement (4) Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. Introduces sociological literature related to the labor movement. Provides a comprehensive and historical overview of research on unions, workers' centers, and other organizational forms and collective actions through which working-class people have sought to improve their working and living conditions.

SOC 135. Class Conflict (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001. Analysis of the sources of social conflict, especially class conflict. Studies social movements arising out of such conflicts, which attempt to bring about fundamental social change.

Women Studies

WMST 101. Women, Work and Capitalism (4) Lecture, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): WMST 001 or consent of instructor. Considers ways in which women's labor is key to the growth of transnational corporations. Examines how class, race, and sexual inequalities impact, contest, and shape gender identities and relations. Analyzes patterns of women's work in the new international division of labor through case studies of export processing zones, reproductive labor, and sex tourism.

Internship Requirement

LABR 198-I. Individual Internship in Labor Studies (1-12 units) Internship, 2-24 hours per week (individual activity); written work, 1-12 hours per week (individual activity). Prerequisites: upper-division standing; consent of instructor. Supervised experience in a labor union or related community organization. Focuses on the issues affecting workers and/or low-income people, as well as the prospects and challenges for achieving social justice for working-class people in the contemporary United States. Fulfills the internship requirement for the Labor Studies minor.

Additional Courses Fulfilling the Labor Studies Minor

Anthropology

ANTH 104. Human Social Organization (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual consultation as needed, 1 hour. An introduction to the study of families, clans, castes, classes, bureaucracies, factions, parties and other forms of human organization. Various aspects of recruitment, social control, communication, social ranking, exchange and conflict are discussed.

ANTH 105/ BUS 158. Organizations as Cultural Systems (4)
Lecture, 6 hours; extra reading and written exercises, 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the role of culture in the formation and management of complex bureaucratic organizations. Covers types of organizations and organizational cultures, the impact of the cultural environment, and problems posed by rapid cultural change. Offered in summer only. Cross-listed with BUS 158.

ANTH 109/ WMST 109. Women, Politics, and Social Movements: Global Perspectives (4)
Lecture, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to "Third World" women's politics. Covers women's politics from a global perspective. Although international in breadth, emphasis is placed on South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean.

ANTH 122. Economic Anthropology (4)
Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 001 or ANTH 001H, ECON 001; or consent of instructor. An approach to the problem of economic development based on the perspectives furnished by anthropological investigations in the less industrialized societies.

ANTH 134. Anthropology of Resource Management (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 001 or ANTH 001H or consent of instructor. Anthropological approaches to the study of resource use and management in cross-cultural perspective. Issues include conservation, development, sustainability, and common property management. Special attention is paid to management of plant and animal resources in foraging, farming, and fishing societies.

ANTH 138. Class and State Formation (4)
Lecture, three hours; outside research, two hours; extra reading, one hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An examination of the dynamics of class and state formation. Explores the consolidation of class structures and state institutions and practices in the context of kin/civil conflict, the distortion and dissolution of non-exploitative social relations, and the constitution of gender, ethnic, and racial hierarchies. Considers ethnogenesis and the construction of state and mass cultures.

ANTH 139. Change and Development (4)
Lecture, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 001 or ANTH 001H or ANTH 003 or ANTH 005; upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines alternative theories of society, change, and development, as well as the assumptions and premises on which they are based. Considers how they are used to explain capitalist development, imperialism, colonial encounters, nationalism, decolonization, socialist revolution, modernization, unequal exchange, uneven development, globalization, and post-colonialism.

ANTH 140T. Agriculture and Rural Society in Mexico: Past and Present (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. The evolution of rural Mexico: from origins of Mesoamerican agriculture to the rise of high civilizations; from the establishment of the colonial system to the demise of colonial agricultural institutions; from the revolution of 1910 to the enactment of land reform and development programs. The role of peasantry in the making of the modern state is emphasized.

ANTH 147/WMST 140. Reproduction: Policies, Politics, and Practices (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing. Examines reproductive policies, politics, and practices from a cross-cultural and historical perspective. Discusses political and economic processes and sociocultural dynamics, population control, sex preference, infanticide and neonatal neglect, adoption and foster parenting, abortion, technologically assisted conception, and gestational surrogacy.

ANTH 148/ WMST 150. Gender and the State (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; outside research, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the various meanings of gender as it is articulated in, reproduced by, and shaped within the state. Discusses gender-state relations, the engendering of politics, state functions, policy, and politics in various historical, political, cultural, and social contexts. Cross-listed with WMST 150.

ANTH 149/WMST 149. Gender, Kinship, and Social Change (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): WMST 001. Examines theories of gender and kinship, the formulation of gender hierarchies and their uneven development, and the dynamics of "family" and gender in stratified social formations. Analyzes the relationship between family forms and political and economic processes.

ANTH 160. Political Economy of Health (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines critical medical anthropology. Focuses on the linkages between political economy, health, and healthcare systems in modern societies. Considers the effects of poverty, occupation, and environmental transformation in particular social contexts. Looks at four case studies: the political economy of HIV/AIDS, poverty, famine, and nuclear regulation.

BUSINESS

BUS 152/ ECON 152. Economics of Labor Relations (4)
Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 002, ECON 003. An analysis of the history of labor and industrial relations in the U.S. with emphasis on problems of collective action, long-swings of economic growth, income inequality, and the role of government.

BUS 153/ ECON 153. Labor Economics (4)
Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 102A. An analysis of labor demand, labor supply, and the structure of wages. Neoclassical, institutional, and radical perspectives emphasized.

BUS 160/ ECON 160. Industrial Organization (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 104B. A study of the organization and structure of the American industrial system. Emphasizes production and pricing behavior and policies. Also addresses market structure and public policies regulating or influencing market behavior.

BUS 176/ ECON 176/ SOC 176. The Sociology of Work in Organizations (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H or consent of instructor. Emphasizes the roles of individuals in organizations. Topics include the effects of jobs on workers, long-term trends in the nature of work, and differences in work among major segments of the labor force.

Dance

DNCE 135. Dance, Race, Property (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 1 hour; term paper, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): DNCE 019 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Explores intersections between dancing bodies, questions of race, and notions of cultural property. Investigates issues of embodied identity and racialization, cultural appropriation and cultural exchange, purity hybridity, and ownership and copyright.

Economics

ECON 115. Marxian Political Economy (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Fundamental concepts of Marxian political economy, including historical materialism, surplus value, exploitation, class analysis, economic crises, the state, socialism, and Marxian methodological foundations.

ECON 116. Foundations of Political Economy (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Explores ways of thinking about economic and social issues precluded by conventional
approaches to economic analysis. Topics include the class relations between labor and capital, discrimination, market socialism, and alternative perspectives on development, macroeconomic instability, and the environment.

ECON 118. The Contemporary United States Economy (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 002 or ECON 002H, ECON 003; or ECON 004. Provides a broad survey of issues relating to the development of the U.S. economy and especially its contemporary structure. Incorporates issues relating to both macro- and microeconomic phenomena, with a focus on questions that are of particular relevance to current policy.

ECON 122E. Economic Aspects of Contemporary Mexican Immigration to the United States (2)
Lecture, 15 hours per quarter; written work, 15 hours per quarter. Prerequisite(s): ECON 002 or ECON 002H, ECON 003; or ECON 004. Examines the origin and nature of migrant flows, their implications for the economic development of Mexico, and impacts on U.S. labor markets, income and wage inequality, provision of social services, and the evolution of government policy.

ECON 123/HISA 123. American Economic History (4)
Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Economic history of the United States from colonial times to the present.

ECON 146/URST 146. Urban Economic Problems (4)
Lecture, three hours; term paper, one hour. Prerequisite(s): ECON 003 or consent of instructor. The application of economic principles to the major problems of the modern urban community, such as poverty, discrimination, deterioration of environment and housing problems. Programs for alleviation or solution.

ECON 155/WMST 155. Women's Labor and the Economy (4)
Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite( s): ECON 002 and ECON 003. Focuses on economic analyses of four topics: women's work in and out of the paid labor force; gender differences in occupation, earnings, and income; marriage, divorce, and childbearing; and public policy regarding women's work and standard of living. Differences among women by race, ethnicity, class, marital status, and parental responsibilities are explored.

ECON 156. Population Dynamics and Economic Well Being (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 002, ECON 003. Examines the causes and consequences of population dynamics. Economic models of such demographic behavior as fertility, mortality, marriage, and migration are presented. Consequences of population change for economic growth, the environment, and well-being are discussed.

ECON 180. Transition from Socialism to Capitalism (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 002 (or ECON 002H), ECON 003; or ECON 004; or consent of instructor. Examines the transition from central planning to a more market-oriented economic system in Central and Eastern Europe, the countries of the former Soviet Union, China, Mongolia, and Vietnam. Evaluates alternative transition strategies using Russia and China as the key examples.

ECON 182. Trade, Globalization, and Development (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 102A. Explores the theory of comparative advantage as a guide to development policy. Discusses trade regimes and their effects on development. Analyzes the nature and consequences of the globalization of the world economy.

Education

ETST 108 (E-Z). Special Topics in Chicano Studies (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Selected topics in: L. The Labor and Legal History of the Chicano; L fulfills the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement, but not both.

EDUC 109. Education in a Diverse Society (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): completion of or current enrollment in one of the following courses: EDUC 002, EDUC 003, EDUC 100B. Analysis of the classroom as a microcosm of society. Focuses on issues related to meeting the educational needs of students with diverse backgrounds and characteristics including gender, religion, ability, ethnicity, culture, socioeconomic status, class, and language.

Ethnic Studies

ETST 100. Race and Ethnicity in a Comparative Perspective (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001. Explores the interrelationships
between race, class, ethnicity, and the operation of social processes. Accordingly, readings for this course center on the comparative well-being of African Americans, Hispanics (especially Chicanos), Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 101A. Historical Development of Race, Racism, and White Supremacy (4)
Seminar, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001 or ETST 001H; two additional lower-division Ethnic Studies courses; upper-division standing or consent of instructor. First of a two-course interdisciplinary sequence on theories of race and ethnicity. Focus is on a critical historical charting of the political, economic, and cultural development of race, racism, and white supremacy. Does not fulfill the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 101B. Theories of Race and Resistance (4)
Seminar, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 101A or consent of instructor. Second of a two-course interdisciplinary sequence on theories of race and ethnicity. Focus is on specific theories of race, dominance and resistance, recognizing the central structuring debates about social formation and social change. Does not fulfill the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 102. Political Economy of Race and Class (4)
Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. This course explores the interrelationships among race, class, ethnicity, and the operation of market processes. Readings for this course will center on the comparative economic well-being of African Americans, Chicanos, Asian Americans, and Native Americans.

ETST 104. Introduction to African Civilization (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to African studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. Describes the dynamics of African society. Examines the Black diaspora's interaction with and influence upon the political and historical developments on the continent of Africa. Evaluates, when relevant, the impact of the non-African upon the African. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of
Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 105A. History of Black Americans: West African Backgrounds to 1877 (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. The study of the experiences of Black people in the United States with emphasis on the ideas and institutions that have shaped those experiences from the period of slave trading in West Africa to 1877. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 105B. History of Black Americans: 1877-1965 (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Focuses on the experiences of Black people in the United States with emphasis on the ideas and institutions that have shaped those experiences from 1877 to 1965. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 106. Theory in Asian American Studies (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
Examines major themes that influenced current theory in Asian American studies: the racist nature of political and legal institutions, labor markets, the popular culture; contemporary feminist theory and politics; criticism of the assimilation paradigm which predicted eventual political and economic integration into mainstream American life. Explores how Asian American communities were viewed as sites for political mobilization, the building of alternative institutions, and the creation of an oppositional culture. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 107. Blacks in America: Assimilation versus Separation (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An analytical survey of the themes of assimilation and separatism in the history of Blacks in the United States. Involves lecture, discussion, readings, and audio-visual presentations. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 108 (E-Z). Special Topics in Chicano Studies (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Selected topics in: E. Culture, Ethnicity, and Social Change; F. The Conditions of Education for Chicanos; I. Mexican Immigration and the Chicano Community; L. The Labor and Legal History of the Chicano; E, F, and I fulfill the Social Sciences requirement; L fulfills the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement, but not both.

ETST 109 (E-Z). Special Topics in African American Studies (1-4)
Lecture, 1-3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 003, upper-division standing; or consent of instructor. Selected topics addressing the issues of the African American experience. Reading, research, and discussion on the African American experience. See the Student Affairs Office in the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences for breadth requirement information.

ETST 109E. African Americans in the U.S. Economy (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 003, upper-division standing; or consent of instructor. Explores the role of African Americans in the U.S. political economy. Examines the interaction of class, race, the state, and social institutions determining the economic life chances of Americans of African descent. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 109F. The Political Economy of the African American Economy (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 003, upper-division standing; or consent of instructor. Examines the transformations in the structure of African American families and households in a society bifurcated by wealth and power. Focuses on the interaction among class, ethnicity, the state, social institutions, and market processes in the formation and structural stability of alternative African American families and households. Fulfills the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement, but not both, for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 109G. Caribbean America: Transplanted West Indians and the Black Immigrant Experience (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 003, upper-division standing; or consent of instructor. Examines the growth and evolution of the transplanted West Indian community in America. Attention is paid to the immigration process, community formation, political participation, economic consolidation, and intellectual and cultural contributions to African America. Explores the varied assortment of readings on the Caribbean American experience and the historiography and methodology of African American history. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement, but not both, for the
College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 109-I. The Black Diaspora: Cultural, Political, and Historical Connections (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 003, upper-division standing; or consent of instructor. Examines the dispersal and evolution of transplanted African populations throughout the world. Emphasis is on the most recent diaspora between 1600 and 1890 when millions of Africans migrated to the Western Hemisphere. The smaller African communities in Asia, Europe, and the Pacific Islands are also examined. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement, but not both, for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 110 (E-Z). Special Topics in Asian American Studies (1-4)
Lecture, 1-3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Selected topics addressing the issues of the Asian American experience. Reading, research, and discussion on the Asian American experience. G. Community Research: Asian American Community; K. Foreign Policy and Asian Americans. G and K fulfill the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 111. Ethnic Politics: Practicum in Political Change (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; practicum, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Studies theories and practices of comparative ethnic political change. Examines topics intrinsic to the understanding of how to effect political change within the Chicano, African American, Asian American, Native American, and other ethnic communities, as well as the dominant societies. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 112/ HISA 135. The Civil Rights Movement, 1950-1970 (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. The main focus will be on the "grass roots." African American aspects of "The Movement," as it was popularly known, from school desegregation to voting rights and beyond. Cross-listed with HISA 135. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 113/ HISA 134. African American Women (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upperdivision standing or consent of instructor. Considers the writings and collective organizational strategies of African American women intellectuals and activists developed in response to the ways racial, sexual, and economic oppression work interdependently and are institutionalized. Beginning with early women's slave narratives, follows black women's agendas for social change to the present. Cross-listed with HISA 134. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 115 (E-Z)/ HISA 144 (E-Z). Topics in Native American History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Selected topics addressing the issues of the Native American. Includes reading, research, and discussion on the Native American experience. F. Early America: Emerging Interpretations. Cross-listed with HISA 144 (E-Z). Segments fulfill the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences.

ETST 116/ HISA 147. Medicine Ways of Native Americans (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Explores the medical history of Native Americans. Focuses on traditional Native American medicine and how Western diseases, medical practices, health care, and policies influenced American Indian health. Topics include medicine people, rituals, ceremonies, smallpox, measles, influenza, anomie, accidents, diabetes, suicides, mental illness, and murders. Crosslisted with HISA 147. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 117 (E-Z)/ HISA 137. Themes and Topics in African History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A thematic and topical approach to the study of African history from the early Nile Valley civilizations to the twentieth century. Examines the temporal and spatial development of African societies—including their social, political, economic, and ideological systems—during the precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial periods. F. West African History to 1800; I. Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Africa and European Imperialism; J. Ancient Africa; K. Africa from 1000-1880; M. Twentieth-Century Africa. Crosslisted with HIST 137 (E-Z). See the Student Affairs Office in the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences for breadth requirement information.

ETST 122. Family, Sex Roles, and the Chicano (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A systematic analysis of Chicano family and sex roles, with special emphasis on the functions of the Chicano family in contemporary society. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 123. Chicano Politics in Comparative Perspective (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analysis of contemporary Chicano politics, political movements, ideologies, relations with intergovernmental agencies, political attitudes, and participation in the political process. Comparison of the Chicano political experience to that of other racial and ethnic groups in American politics. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 124. The Chicana (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. The unique experience of the Chicana viewed from social, intellectual, historical, and artistic perspectives. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 125. Chicano Political History: Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (4)
Seminar, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 002 or ETST 002H or ETST 004/HIST 004; upper-division standing. Surveys the history of Chicano politics in the United States from Mexican independence in 1821 to the present. Assesses the continuity of the Chicano political tradition through a comparison of the Chicano political experience before and after the establishment of American sovereignty. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 126. The Chicano and the Law (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upperdivision standing or consent of instructor. Analysis of the relationship of the Chicano to the U.S. legal and judicial system. Topics include traditional sociological and criminological theories, history of the Chicano and the law, the Pachuco image and the Chicano, and the police and correctional institutions. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of
Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 127. Latino Men and Masculinity (5)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours; written work, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001 or ETST 001H or ETST 002 or ETST 002H or ETST 003 or ETST 005 or ETST 005H or ETST 007 or ETST 007H or consent of instructor. Analysis of Chicano/Latino men and masculinity in historical and comparative perspective. Examines social construction and expression of manhood and masculinity in a cross-national context and the range and varieties of masculinities in Latino America. Critically evaluates and deconstructs common myths, stereotypes, and misconceptions about men, machismo, and masculinity. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 128/ SOC 128. Chicano Sociology (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analysis of the experience of Mexicans in U.S. society; history as a minority; mass immigration in the twentieth century, relationships with American institutions, present socioeconomic status, variations in social status from region to region, political emergence and variations in values, social relations and integration with non-Mexicans. Cross-listed with SOC 128. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 129. Theories in Chicano Studies (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001 or ETST 001H; ETST 002; ETST 004/HIST 004; upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analyzes prevailing and emerging theories, paradigms, and perspectives in Chicano Studies. Examines and applies traditional social science theories of race and ethnicity such as the order/pluralistic, assimilationist, and functionalist models, as well Marxism, internal colonialism, feminism, postmodernism, and critical race theory to the experiences of Chicanos and other Latinos. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities,
Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 131. Race, Class, and Gender (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Compares and contrasts race, class, and gender in relation to social inequality and oppression. Focuses on the intersection of all three components, as well as examines the experiences of poor and working-class women of color.

ETST 132. Chicano Contemporary Issues (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Provides students with demographic and historical overview of the status of Latinos in the United States today, and of the salient issues plaguing them. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, analyzes strategies, tactics, and policies that may effectively deal with these issues. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 133. Asian Diaspora: Historical, Contemporary, and Comparative Perspectives (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A survey of the dispersal, transplantation, and transformation of Asian populations in selected regions of the world—the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia Pacific—as viewed from the historical and contemporary experiences of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans, Vietnamese, and other Asian groups in the contexts of colonization, cultural and political domination, and an emerging global economy. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 134. Asian American History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; written work, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Overview of the Asian American experience in the United States before World War II. Describes how the racialization of Asians as "non-White" and nonassimilable shaped the experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and South Asians in America. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 135. The Mass Incarceration of Japanese Americans (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Overview of mass incarceration of Japanese Americans within their overall experience in the United States. Emphasis is on variables that generated similarities and internal diversity within the broaderethnic group. Also explores the broad relevance of mass incarceration for understanding our post-9/11 world. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 136. The Korean American Experience (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the history of Koreans in the United States to analyze a wide range of contemporary social and identity issues. Students are encouraged to do original research, develop writing and communication skills, and devise research projects that address the immigrant Korean community's needs. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 137. The Vietnamese Americans: The Refugee and Immigrant Experience (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. This course will focus on the Vietnamese American experience in contemporary society. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship of Vietnamese Americans to the larger society and on intergenerational strains and conflicts. Among the topics addressed are: 1) socioeconomic and educational problems; 2) the family; 3) religion; and 4) the relationship between Vietnamese Americans and other racial ethnic groups (African Americans, Native Americans, Anglos, and Chicanos). Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 139. Contemporary Issues in the Asian American Community (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analyzes contemporary issues facing Asian Americans: Asian American identity and images, education, employment, housing, dual oppression, interethnic conflicts, juvenile delinquency, generational conflicts, and anti-Asian violence. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 140. Asian American Women (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upperdivision standing or consent of instructor. Addresses the shifting role of Asian American women in the United States as they struggle to define their identities between and within diverse and often opposing cultures. The myths and realities of being an Asian American woman are explored and analyzed through literature, art, documents, films, and first-person accounts. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 142. Organizations, Institutions, and the Chicano (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. The study of organizations and institutions, focusing on their effect on the Chicano. Special emphasis will be placed on the processes of participation within institutions and of dealing with complex organizations. Concepts to be studied include conflict, role identity, and socialization. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 143A. Critical Filipina(o) Studies: Histories and Legacies of US Conquest, Colonialism, and Empire (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Critically examines and theorizes the historical impact and legacies of U.S. conquest and colonialism in the Philippines. Analyzes the origins of Filipino American civic existence and its links to histories of U.S. racial formation, racialized industrialization, and racialized frontier warfare. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 143B. Critical Filipino(a) Studies: Interrogating the Filipino American Present (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 143A; upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Critically analyzes the emergence of Filipino American community and identity discourses in relation to the U.S. emancipation of the Philippines and the complex restructuring of a neocolonial and imperial relation. Examines the theoretical and conceptual premises of Filipino Americanism through counterhegemonic social movements, cultural production, and identity formation. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 144. Race and Ethnicity in Hawaii (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001 or ETST 005. A comparative and historical survey of the racial dynamics of Hawaii's multicultural community and the intersections between Hawaii's ethnic groups: the native Hawaiians, the white ("haole") population, and the plantation immigrant groups, especially the Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and Portuguese. Includes a discussion of the Pacific Islander population in contemporary Hawaii. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 145/ SOC 145. Law and Subordination (5)
Lecture, 3 hours; field, 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing in Ethnic Studies or Sociology; ETST 128/SOC 128. A comparative and historical analysis of subordinated communities and law with special emphasis on integrating theoretical understanding of racial, class, and gender subordination. Field experience working directly with groups that have traditionally lacked equal access to the legal and judicial system. Cross-listed with SOC 145. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 146/ EDUC 146. Educational Perspectives on the Chicano (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor. An examination of educational policy issues concerning Chicano students, such as testing and testing procedures, learning styles, socialization, and language acquisition. Other topics will deal with the impact of significant legislative acts related to the education of Chicanos. Cross-listed with EDUC 146. Does not fulfill the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 147. History of Black Education (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 4 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing. This course examines major themes in Black education: the education of slave and free Blacks; role of missionaries and philanthropists in Black education; the growth of Black colleges; curricular debates; and the NAACP challenge of the "separate but equal" doctrine. Does not fulfill the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 148/ ANTH 168/ LNST 168. Caribbean Culture and Society (4)
Seminar, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An overview of the Caribbean region from a historical, cultural, and political perspective. Emphasis on contemporary issues affecting the Caribbean, and the struggle of its people to maintain their identities. Cross-listed with ANTH 168 and LNST 168. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences

ETST 149. Street Scholars: Struggles and Contributions of Self-Trained Black Historians and Stepladder Radicals (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the growth and evolution of self-trained African American intellectuals and
activists from the late nineteenth century to the 1980s. Analyzes ideas, contributions, and worldviews of selected street scholars pertaining to the destiny and direction of race struggle in America, the Caribbean, and Africa. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social
Sciences.

ETST 150. Asian American Family and Culture (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 005 or consent of instructor. Examines the influence of cultural legacy, ethnic background, immigration history, community structure, racism, class, and economic status on the sociological and psychological dynamics of the Asian American family and personality. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 155. Chicana/o California: A Social and Cultural History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Examination of the historical evolution of Mexican and Mexican American social and cultural experience in California from the Spanish colonial period through the late twentieth century. Analysis of the Chicana/o impact on regional culture and American society as a whole. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 156. Politics of the Chicano Movement (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the various aspects of the politics of the Chicano movement from 1965 to 1974. Focuses on in-depth analysis of the movement's historical genesis, leadership, ideology, organizations, strategy, and tactics, as well as the issues that brought it into being. Also examines the forces that contributed to its demise. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 157. Native American Diaspora (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 007, upper-division standing; or consent of instructor. Analyzes historical Native American migrations. Explores involuntary Native American diaspora throughout America forced by interaction with Spanish, French, Dutch, and English colonists. Examines nineteenth- and twentieth-century reservations and forced and voluntary removals and relocations. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 158. Roots of American Indian Tradition (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analyzes selected spiritual beliefs of America's native peoples. Examines sacred beliefs, oral histories, ceremonies, customs, and the historical significance of selected tribes and bands. Explores the conditions and forces which shaped American Indians and influence them today. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 159. Texas Indian History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 007 or ETST 007H or HIST 035 or HIST 036 or HIST 037 or consent of instructor. History of the aboriginal peoples of Texas from the earliest times to the present. Examines pre-colonial eras, European invasion, and colonialism under Mexico, the Republic of Texas, and the United States. Discusses the effects of treaties, laws, and federal and state policies on modern Texas Indians. Emphasizes the survival and adaptation of native peoples of Texas. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 161. U.S. Latinos: Crossing Borders, Crossing Cultures (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduces the idea of Latino identity as a way to study heterogeneity of ethnic group identification.
Focuses on historical chronology, literary tradition, and other cultural practices. Emphasis is on the experience of diversity and pluralism within the Latino experience. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 166. Issues in Bilingual/Bicultural Education (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): bilingual facility and consent of instructor. An intensive analysis of issues involved in developing and implementing bicultural/bilingual programs for Chicano children. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 167/ PSYC 167. Psychological Development of Black Children (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 002. This course will analyze both the traditional theoretical approaches to the study of Black children and innovative approaches that are currently being developed by Black psychologists. The course will cover topics in the areas of cognitive, social, and personality development. Cross-listed with PSYC 167. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 168/ PSYC 168. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 002. This course examines the interdependence between personal characteristics. African American culture, and the social conditions which foster the Black experience. Group membership, life styles, role factors, and situational settings as social norms will be explored in order to understand the uniqueness of the Black experience. Cross-listed with PSYC 168. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 175/ WMST 175. Gender, Ethnicity, and Borders (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001 or WMST 010 or upper-division standing. Examines literary, theatrical, and visual sites where the "in-between" space of border cultures is mapped. Materials include autobiographies, testimonial literature, films, novels, performance scripts, and art. The interplay of gender and ethnicity is the special focus. Cross-listed with WMST 175. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 176. Geographies of Pain: Black Women, Trauma, and Survival (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Explores the relationship between gender and violence. Illustrates ways in which crimes such as incest are not just instances of dysfunction within the black family but are also examples of the roles gender and race play in the historical violence of the nation-state. Examines how integral violence is to the creation of blackness and to the necessity to envision practices of survival. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 177. The U.S. Prison Industrial Complex: Race, Gender and Citizenship (4)
Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the racialized and gendered information of U.S. jurisprudence, policing, and punishment practices. Explores the connections between prison expansion, corporate investment in prison and policing technology, exploitation of prison labor, and deployment of prison-building initiatives as pork barrels for elected officials. Also analyzes anti-prison, prison reform, and penal abolitionist discourses.

ETST 178. Imprisoned Radical Intellectuals and U.S. Liberation (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examination of the work of imprisoned writers of color as well as white intellectuals/activists who
have influenced the formation of social movements in the United States since the 1970s as prisons and jails
have become primary sites of political and racial conflict. Elaborates how race, gender, and patriarchy are
central to the establishment of state regimes of incarceration. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 179. Understanding Whiteness: Racialization and Identity Formation in American Culture (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analysis of U.S. racialization, identity formation, institutionalized racism, and structural inequality from the early Republic to the present. Examines continuing evolution of a national white racial consciousness; the legal, social, and economic exploitation of people of color; and the transfer of inherited legacies and benefits along racialized power lines. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the
College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 180/ HISA 140. California Indian History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Provides students with a broad understanding of the rich and varied heritage and history of California Indians from the invasion of the Spanish to the twentieth century. Examines geographically and culturally diverse groups as a means of illustrating the various Euro-American Indian policies that affected native Californians. Course is comparative and thematic. Cross-listed with HISA 140. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 181/ HISA 141. Southwestern Indian History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Presents a historical examination of selected Native American groups in the Southwest. Examines the relationship of Southwestern Indians to the Spanish, Mexican, and United States governments. Focuses on Quechans, Tohono O'Odom, Yavapai, Chiracahuas, Navajos, Zunis, Hopis, Comanches, and selected Pueblos along the Rio Grande. Cross-listed with HISA 141. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 182/ HISA 142. Northwestern Indian History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upperdivision standing or consent of instructor. Examines selected aspects of Northwestern Indian History, from approximately the 1750s to the twentieth century. Deals with several native groups along the Northwest coast from Alaska to Oregon. Compares policies of the Russian, Spanish, English, and United States governments. Particular emphasis on the 1850s when the U.S. negotiated a number of treaties with Native Americans in the Washington and Oregon territories. Cross-listed with HISA 142. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 184. American Indian Policy in the Twentieth Century (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; consultation, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. This course will begin with the end of the treaty-making period and the point in time that the United States emerged as a colonial power (1871). The history of the relationship between the United States government and the American Indian tribes from the year 1871 to 1988 will be presented phase by phase. In addition, it will explore the position and role of the American Indian during the last twenty years. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 185. Native American Law (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Emphasis on traditional law, civil and criminal rights, water rights, First Amendment religious freedom, and gaming on reservations. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 186. Policing and the Hegemony of "Law and Order": Race, Gender, Sexuality, Citizenship, and the Politics of Criminalization (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; class project, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001. Provides a critical approach to the interdisciplinary study of state violence and militarized policing. Examines ways in which policing technologies and tactics are organized through racialized, gendered, and classed hierarchies. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 187. The Social and Political Thought of Frantz Fanon (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Examines the recent emergence of "Fanon Studies," an interdisciplinary subfield focused on the political-intellectual work of Frantz Fanon and related intellectuals. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

ETST 188. Native American Women (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to Native American gender systems and the changing roles of women. Examines the cultural productions of indigenous women that make important interventions in our understanding of gender and social justice in contemporary Native America. Materials include testimonial literature, autobiographies, films, novels, and popular culture. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

ETST 189. Popular Culture and the Production of Race (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; screening, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ETST 001 or ETST 001H, ETST 100; or consent of instructor. Offers an interdisciplinary and theoretical approach to the study of various popular film and television genres in relation to the production—and contestation—of racial meaning. Concerned with the material significance of film and television as, simultaneously, "entertainment," "pleasure," "mass culture," "(self-) representation," and "cultural resistance or insurgency." Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

Global Studies

GBST 100. Global Cities (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; field, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): GBST 001 or GBST 002. A study of urban life as it has emerged in various parts of the world through application of theories of space and the city. Considers how colonialism, urban planning, migration, and trade have influenced contemporary urban environments. Projects explore the city as representation and lived experience in Riverside and Southern California.

GBST 110. Global Migrations and Movements (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; field, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): GBST 001 or GBST 002. Examines migration and mobility (both global and interregional). Also addresses economic development and displacement of populations and issues of identity and subjectivity in the context of recent theories of mobility and globalization to understand how migration is reshaping borders, ideas of self, political and social entities, and transnational issues.

History/History of the Americas/History of Europe

HISA 110C. The Early Republic: The United States, 1789-1848 (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analyzes social, economic, political, and intellectual forces that transformed the United States from a fledgling preindustrial nation into a sprawling, exuberant, capitalist society. Topics include industrialism, capitalism, Christianity, democratic politics, slavery and racial structures, abolitionism, and American radicalism and nationalism.

HISA 113. Slavery and the Old South (4)
Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An investigation of slavery in the antebellum South. Topics include: the emergence of the self-conscious South, the romanticized plantation, American historians and slavery, etc.

HISA 115. Reconstruction (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Major leaders and events of post-Civil War America, with emphasis upon Reconstruction, racial and political conflict, industrial growth, and other historical developments that helped shape the modern South and the expanding nation.

HISA 117A. United States, 1914 to 1945 (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upperdivision standing or consent of instructor. Topics include the emergence of the United States as a global power, the second industrial revolution, the development of a consumer culture, and the creation of a regulatory state.

HISA 119. Modern U.S. Consumer Culture (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the history and culture of mass consumerism in the United States. Topics include the shift from mass production to mass consumption; the growth of advertising and product marketing; the rise of the department store and shopping mall; the relationship of race, ethnicity, and gender to the market; globalization; and anticonsumerism.

HISA 123/ECON 123. American Economic History (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ECON 002 (or ECON 002H), ECON 003; or ECON 004. Covers the economic history of the United States from colonial times to the present. Cross-listed with ECON 123.

HISA 124. Labor and Working Class History of the United States (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to the history of work, workers and their families, communities, organizations, unions, and workers' organizations in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Attention is paid to gender, race, immigration, and diversity of the work force, and role of government, within an economic and international context.

HISA 132/ WMST 132. U.S. Women, Gender, and Sexuality: 1620-1850 (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Covers topics in early American women's lives—work, politics, and sexuality—while charting the developments of gendered systems in the United States. Topics may include masculinity, the rise of the middle class, and the private-public dichotomy. Crosslisted with WMST 132.

HISA 146/ WMST 146. History of Native American Women (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines selected important aspects of the lives of Native North American women, including their political, economic, and religious participation in their societies. Further traces historic changes in Native women's lives as a result of the colonization of the New World and examines the complex imagery of Native women that developed from colonial contact. Cross-listed with WMST 146.

HISE 148B. Women and Gender in Europe, 1800-present (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An introductory survey of women and gender in Europe. Topics include changes in gender relations and the roles of women in the family, workplace, and politics; sexuality and science; and the debate over the "woman question."

HISA 160/ LNST 170. Colonial Latin America (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 2 hours; term paper, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to independence with an emphasis upon selected themes concerning the social, economic, and cultural aspects of colonialism. Cross-listed with LNST 170.

HISA 161/ LNST 171. Nineteenth-Century Latin America (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Topics include the breakdown of political order and the problem of the nation-state, liberalism and conservatism, slavery and abolition, foreign intervention and capital investment, the reemergence of political order in the Age of Liberalism (1860-1900), and social and cultural change. Cross-listed with LNST 171.

HISA 162/ LNST 172. Twentieth-Century Latin America (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Topics include the Mexican Revolution, the Great Depression, populism, industrialization, revolution, and the emergence of conservative regimes in the age of neoliberalism. Cross-listed with LNST 172.

HISA 165. Modern Brazil: State and Society (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Analyzes power and resistance in Brazilian history with emphasis on the social and political movements challenging state power. Topics include slave rebellions, banditry, millenarian uprisings, the industrial working class, the urban poor, social Catholicism, feminism, and "Black Power."

History

HIST 108/ ENGR 108. Technology in Premodern Civilizations (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Examines relations between society, machine, and state in ancient China, Greece, and Rome, and in medieval Europe. Focuses on key mechanical and civil technologies and the role of the state in differentiating their development between the four historic civilizations. A major theme concerns the relation of craft and state technologies to abstract natural reasoning as a historical background to scientific revolution in Europe.

HIST 109/ ENGR 109. Technology in Modern Europe and America, 1700-Present (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the emergence of modernity in Europe, the first and second industrial revolutions in Europe and America, the development of device commodities as the typical form of consumer technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, philosophical issues in understanding technology, and whether or not the technological social structures in the United States are an exception to those developed in Europe.

HIST 182. Modern China (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor; HIST 180 and HIST 181 are recommended. Examines the history of China from the Opium War to the early Communist period (1842-1960). The emphasis is on reaction to the Western impact and modernization.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Intersexual, and Transgender Studies

LGBS 128/ WMST 128. Critical Approaches to Heterosexuality (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 2 hours; written work, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): LGBS 001 or WMST 001 or WMST 001H. Examines the late nineteenth-century origins and twentieth-century evolution of the meaning of heterosexuality in the United States. Includes the medical, psychological, and political history of hetero- sexuality; the race and gender components of hetero- sexuality; and the intersections of heterosexuality and queerness. Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) grading is not available. Cross-listed with WMST 128.

LGBS 134/ WMST 134. Queer Identities and Movements in the United States (4) Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; individual study, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper- division standing or consent of instructor. Examines important twentieth- and twenty-first century develop- ments in queer culture and activism in the United States. Focuses on the origins of sexual identity; the relationship between sexuality, race, and gender; queer representation in art and media; and central issues in queer theory. Cross-listed with WMST 134.

LGBS 135/ WMST 135. Love, Desire, and Lesbian Sexuality (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Expands upon the notion of lesbian identifi- cation and sexuality. Emphasizes the influence of fem- inism on the interdisciplinarity of lesbian studies and the complexity of lesbianism across class, race, eth- nic, age, and national and international differences. Cross-listed with WMST 135.

LGBS 137/ WMST 137. Critical Queer Politics (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 2 hours; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): WMST 001 or WMST 001H or con- sent of instructor. Presents Euro-American configura- tions of modern sexuality to map queer communities and homosexual presence across time and space. Critically explores the invisibilities, injustices, erasures, distortions, silences, and voices produced as a result of queer mobility, global gay and global queer libera- tion. Cross-listed with WMST 137.

LGBS 139/ WMST 139. Coming Out and Sexual Identity (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 1 hour; extra reading, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): LGBS 001 or WMST 001 or WMST 001H or consent of instructor. Examines speech acts, secrecy, and silence to understand the significance of the closet. Explores perspectives on resistant movements and modes of communication related to coming out. Considers coming out stories, biographies, examinations of the social construction of heterosexual identities and formation of public space. Cross-listed with WMST 139.

Political Science

POSC 108. Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity in the United States (5)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour; term paper, 2 hours; extra reading, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor; POSC 010 or POSC 010H. Examines the politics of race, immigration, and ethnicity in the United States, including comparisons between African Americans and Latino, Asian, and European immigrants. Emphasizes the role of institutions in shaping the importance of race to politics in the United States.

POSC 116/ POSC 116S. Capitalism, Socialism, and Political Theory (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines debates about economic life, focusing on issues such as markets and marketization, labor, globalization, freedom, class, corporations, democracy, the welfare state, and power.

POSC 126. The Politics of International Trade, Finance, and Development (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): POSC 020 or POSC 020H. A study of the interaction between international economics and world politics. Focuses on the post- World War II period and covers the evolution of the institutions governing world trade; the role of multinational corporations; Third World debt and development; the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union; economic reform in postcommunist societies; and the relationship between trade and the environment.

POSC 130. Politics and Economics of the Pacific Rim (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Provides students with a broad understanding of the politics and economics of countries that border the Pacific Rim, including Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, and China, and of their relationship to the United States. The major issues addressed include economic growth, sociopolitical development, trade, and interdependence.

POSC 147. Political Theory of Globalization (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing; PHIL 001 or PHIL 001H or POSC 005 or POSC 005H. Examines how the phenomenon of globalization has been theorized within the discipline of political philosophy. Covers how the effects of globalization have been addressed by leading political theorists, with attention to concepts such as cosmopolitanism, nation-states and citizenship, cultural diversity, moral universalism, and international distributive justice.

POSC 160A. Globalization and Underdevelopment (4)
Lecture, three hours; individual study, one hour; extra reading, one hour; term paper, one hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Critical evaluation of issues and theories about underdevelopment and the prospects for development within the context of globalization. Examines areas of continuity and change, resistance and conflict, and crises and solutions emerging in a post-World War II developing world increasingly connected to a single global economy.

POSC 164. The Nation State and Capitalism (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 2 hours; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Covers the comparative political economy of advanced industrial countries. Examines forms of capitalism after World War II. Studies political foundations and institutional features and their relation to economic growth, investment, innovation, international trade, employment, and economic quality. Analyzes the impact of globalization on labor relations, social welfare, financial market regulation, and corporate governance. Credit is awarded for only one of POSC 164 or POSC 164S.

POSC 164S. The Nation State and Capitalism (5)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour; extra reading, 2 hours; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Covers the comparative political economy of advanced industrial countries. Examines forms of capitalism after World War II. Studies political foundations and institutional features and their relation to economic growth, investment, innovation, international trade, employment, and economic quality. Analyzes the impact of globalization on labor relations, social welfare, financial market regulation, and corporate governance. Credit is awarded for only one of POSC 164 or POSC 164S.

POSC 182. Politics of Economic Policy (5)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the political and administrative processes of economic policy formation, the rationale of government programs, and the mixture of facts, values, and social forces that determine policy. Emphasizes issues of government-economy interaction emerging under the impact of modern technology.

POSC 186. Regulation: A Political Perspective (5)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or con- sent of instructor. Examines government regulation from a political perspective, covering both traditional areas of business regulation and the newer social regulation in areas of environment, health and safety, and personal behavior. Evaluates rationales for and against regulation, in theory and through case studies.

Psychology

PSYC 142. Industrial Organizational Psychology (4) Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 002. Introduction to the filed of industrial/organizational psychology covering fundamental theory and research in personnel and organizations. Topics include employee selection and training, performance appraisal, motivation, organizational dynamics, leadership, and job satisfaction.

Sociology

SOC 112. Sociology of the Labor Movement (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. Introduces sociological literature related to the labor movement. Provides a comprehensive and historical overview of research on unions, workers' centers, and other organizational forms and collective actions through which working-class people have sought to improve their working and living conditions.

SOC 120. Human Social Institutions (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. A comparative analysis of the historical and evolutionary development of basic human institutions, including economy, kinship, religion, polity, law, education, medicine, and science. Emphasis is on the historical emergence and differentiation of institutions, and on the dynamic interconnections among institutions in contemporary societies

SOC 122. Social Change (5)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. A study of patterns of social change, resistance to change, and change-producing processes and agencies.

SOC 123. Human Societies (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 001 or ANTH 001H or SOC 001 or SOC 001H. An analysis of the emergence and development of human societies from hunters and gathers to horticultural, agrarian, and industrial forms of social organization. Topics include social networks, societal change, the transition from food collecting to food producing, early Germanic societies, the rise of the West, and the causes of the industrial revolution.

SOC 125. Evolutionary Sociology (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; written work, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. Examines the objectives and scope of a cross-section of approaches that use evolutionary rea- soning to examine such topics as social evolution, human evolution, our primate heritage, neurobiology, and human nature.

SOC 129. Racism in Western Society (4) Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. An analysis of the origins, character, maintenance, and consequences of racism in Western society with an emphasis on the United States.

SOC 130. Race and Ethnic Relations (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. A study of underrepresented racial and ethnic groups past and present. Involves a search for general principles about their social relations.

SOC 131 (E-Z). Selected Ethnic Groups (4) Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. In-depth studies of particular ethnic groups in the United States. Treats a specific ethnic group for an entire quarter: F. Black Americans; H. Jewish Americans.

SOC 132. Field Research on Internalized Racism (4) Lecture, 3 hours; field, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H; ETST 128/SOC 128 or SOC 129 or SOC 130 or a segment of SOC 131 (E-Z) or SOC 133 or SOC 136. Studies the dynamics of internalized racism among people and communities of color, using advanced research methods and data analysis.

SOC 133. Inequality and Social Class (4) Lecture, three hours, outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001. Covers the analysis of theory and research concerning sources of inequality in the distribution of scarce rewards in societies; the influence of aspects of social class; and processes involving the hierarchical allocation of social groups to positions.

SOC 134. Law, Race, Class, Gender, and Culture (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001. An introduction to law, jurisprudence, and legal reasoning focusing on the roles that race, class, gender, culture, and language play in law and jurisprudence. Includes an overview of the development of modern American legal thought and various schools of jurisprudence such as legal realism. Discusses modern challenges to legal formalism by critical legal studies, critical race theory, and feminist jurisprudence. Analyzes the equal protection doctrine and recent legal attacks on affirmative action and immigrants.

SOC 135. Conflict (4)
Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001. Analysis of the sources of social conflict, especially class conflict. Studies social movements arising out of such conflicts, which attempt to bring about fundamental social change.

SOC 136. Asian Americans (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. Examines the two waves of Asian immigration: the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century immigrations from China, Japan, and the Philippines, and the post-1965 "new immigration" from Southeast Asia, Korea, and other parts of Asia. Considers the causes of immigration, the adaptation of Asians to the United States, and the reaction of society to their presence.

SOC 140. The Sociology of Women (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H; enrollment priority is given to Sociology majors, Sociology/Administrative Studies majors, and Sociology/Law and Society majors. Analyzes the role women have played in society, with an emphasis on modern American society. Considers some of the social determinants of women's positions and the efforts being made to bring about change.

SOC 141. Men and Masculinity (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. A comparative and historical exploration of the social and personal meanings of masculinity with special emphasis on the American experience. Topics include socialization, sports and war, friendship, intimacy, sexuality, fathering, and work. Particular attention is paid to the role of masculinity in systems of gender inequality.

SOC 143/ URST 143. Urban Sociology (5)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours; field, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H or consent of instructor. A comparative examination of metropolitan and other urban communities, with emphasis on processes of urbanization. Cross-listed with URST 143.

SOC 150. Sociology of Economic Organizations (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines how the scope and nature of formal and informal organizations are shaped by sociological processes external to them, such as the influence of governments, institutions, networks, and resources. Illustrates the processes with examples from contemporary United States and from other periods and cultures.

SOC 151. Formal Organizations (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the structures of formal organizations, the forces that shape them, and the impact they have on their participants, their environments, and one another. Surveys the major classical and contemporary theories of human behavior in organizations.

SOC 153. Sexualities (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H; SOC 028. Examines sexual practices and identities from a sociological perspective. Discusses the evolution of knowledge about sexuality, historical and cultural variations in sexual norms and identities, sexual politics and popular culture, and the social control of sexuality (e.g., moral panics, sexual violence, and state regulation of sexual identities or practices).

SOC 154. Sport and Gender (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H or WMST 001. Considers the intersection of politics, economics, society, culture, and representation in sport. Combines theoretical work and applied study for students interested in social theory and cultural studies. Assumes that gender is a fundamental factor in sport and vice versa. Cross-listed with WMST 154.

SOC 155 (E-Z). Topics in the Sociology of Gender (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H; SOC 028. Intensively studies selected topics in the sociology of gender. E. Feminist Movements in the United States; G. Queer Theory. Segments are repeatable.

SOC 156. Community (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; term paper, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. Involves a historical and comparative treatment of the community as a social system; political and economic forces shaping the sense of community; and influences of urbanization, industrialization, and bureaucratization on local social systems.

SOC 161. Immigration and Society (4)
Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001. Analyzes the origins of immigration and its nature, patterns, and trends in the twentieth century in Western societies, with special emphasis on the United States. Topics include theories of immigration, causes of immigration, sources of immigrants, immigration laws, reactions to immigrants, and the effects of immigration on the host society.

SOC 162. Linguistic Diversity in the United States (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. Examines the linguistic diversity that has characterized the sociohistorical development of United States society.

SOC 171. Alternatives to Bureaucratic Organizations (4)
Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or consent of instructor. Examines organizational models that challenge the alleged superiority of bureaucratic organization. Topics range from cooperatives, professional partnerships, and worker-owned firms to the use of participative management, autonomous teams, and employee stock ownership in otherwise conventionally owned firms. Recommended for Business Administration majors.

SOC 176/BUS 176. Sociology of Work in Organizations (4)
Lecture, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or consent of instructor. Emphasizes the roles of individuals in organizations. Topics include the effects of jobs on workers, long-term trends in the nature of work, and the differences in work among major segments of the labor force.

SOC 181. World Systems and Globalization (4)
Lecture, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or consent of instructor. Systematic comparisons of societies and world-systems with emphasis on changes in the logic of social development.

SOC 183 (E-Z). Special Topics in Sociology (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. Special topics in sociology not a regular part of the curricular offerings in the department. G. Collective Behavior; P. Poverty and Welfare; W. Social Mobility.

SOC 184. Environmental Sociology (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): SOC 001 or SOC 001H. A sociological approach to the study of mainstream environmentalism, societal implications of environmental reform, the nature of distriburtive impacts (costs and benefits), environmental conflict resolution, land-use decision making, and the placement of noxious facilities in minority, working class, and poor communities.

Women's Studies

WMST 100. Gender Theory (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A cross-cultural, multidisciplinary course investigating the development of feminist theory and exploring the construction of gender and sexuality, with emphasis on the "female" and the "feminine" in a variety of cultural contexts. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

WMST 101. Women, Work and Capitalism (4)
Lecture, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): WMST 001 or consent of instructor. Considers ways in which women's labor is key to the growth of transnational corporations. Examines how class, race, and sexual inequalities impact, contest, and shape gender identities and relations. Analyzes patterns of women's work in the new international division of labor through case studies of export processing zones, reproductive labor, and sex tourism.

WMST 103/ ANTH 145. Sexualities and Culture (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): WMST 001 or consent of instructor. Examines the field of sexuality studies using a comparative, cross-cultural approach. Emphasizes the relation between culture, history, and political economy in the emergence of sexual practices and sexualized identities. Examines theories of sexuality and identity, with particular attention to violence, human rights, and political agency. Cross-listed with ANTH 145. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences

WMST 105. Women, Race, and Violence: Intersectionalist and Transnational Perspectives (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; screening, 8 hours per quarter; extra reading, 2 hours; written work, 1 hour.
Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduces the theories of violence against women through intersectionalist feminist perspectives. Involves the analysis of violence simultaneously marked by race, ethnicity, nation, class, and sexual orientation. Compares cross-cultural and transnational perspectives. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 107. Feminisms, Race, and Antiracisms: Critical Theories and Intersectional Perspectives (4) Seminar, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; individual study, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines how path-breaking scholarship by women of color in the United States and in developing countries has been central to rethinking theoretical foundations and to new ways of knowing, understanding, and practicing politics. Focuses on scholarship that critiques and analyzes issues concerning race, antiracism, human rights, citizenship, empire, globalization, and social justice. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

WMST 108/ PHIL 108. Philosophical Issues of Race and Gender (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Investigates philosophical issues concerning race and gender. Themes include the role of cultural and biological criteria in defining these concepts; the roles of race and gender in personal identity; the nature of racism, sexism, and their variants; and policy implications such as affirmative action and the civil status of homosexual relationships. Cross-listed with PHIL 108. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 133/ HISA 133. Women, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. History: 1850-Present (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduces students to major themes in the history of U.S. women and gender issues. Drawing upon recent work in the field, it explores the relationships between gendered meanings of politics and the politics of gender in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the United States. Cross-listed with HISA 133. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 134/ LGBS 134. Queer Identities and Movements in the United States (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; individual study, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): upperdivision standing or consent of instructor. Examines the evolution of feminist activism in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on feminist organizing since the 1960s. Explores how homophobia, race, and class inequality in the first and second wave movements produced narrow definitions of women's issues. Considers efforts to redefine feminism and the postfeminism era. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 135/ LGBS 135. Love, Desire, and Lesbian Sexuality (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Focuses on "text" as a way to frame one's position, listen to women's voices, and explore lesbian experiences. By discussing critical theory and commentaries, autobiography, performance, and visual and popular culture, students examine the cultural, political, and performance potential of lesbian subjectivity. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 136. Women and Grassroots Organizing in the United States (4)
Seminar, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; individual study, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Considers the complexity of women's experiences
within the context of culture, society, political economy, and history. Examines challenges that women face in a society that creates divisions based on race, class, and gender. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 138. Gender and the Sex Trade (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; individual study, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Addresses structural issues related to sexualized entertainment, including pornography, sex work, escort services, sex tourism, erotic dancing, and strip shows. Discusses how gender, race, class, citizenship, and sexuality shape the stratification of the industry. Analyzes how issues such as HIV/AIDS, traffic in women, forced prostitution, and child prostitution impact the sex trade and people working in this industry. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 150/ ANTH 148. Gender and the State (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; outside research, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the various meanings of gender as it is articulated in, reproduced by, and shaped within the state. Discusses gender-state relations, the engendering of politics, state functions, policy, and politics in various historical, political, cultural, and social contexts. Cross-listed with ANTH 148. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 151. Islam, Women, and the State (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 2 hours; extra reading, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the links between women, Islamic practices, and the politics of state formation and nation building. Explores ways women constitute the terrain of struggle between the traditional and modern, colonialism and nationalism, and religion and politics. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 156. Women and Citizenship (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; outside research, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour; . Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Explores women's citizenship in light of global movements of people, capital, and social and political rights. Examines what it means to be a citizen and the ways in which women are included or excluded from that category. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 161. Gender and Science (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): WMST 001. Focuses on the intersections of Western constructions of gender and of scientific knowledge since the sixteenth century. Considers the cultural and political roles of the scientist in terms of gender, the structuring of "objectivity" and objects of study, scientific agendas, the status of scientific knowledges, and the emergence of feminist science studies. Cross-cultural comparisons and literary works are also brought to bear on these questions. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 162/ RLST 162. Women's Issues in Modern Muslim Thought (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): one Religious Studies course or upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduces complex religious and social issues related to the role of women in modern Islamic societies ranging from North America to Southeast Asia through an examination of Muslim writings produced during the past century. Cross-listed with RLST 162. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 163/ RLST 163. The Women of Early Christianity (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Explores the social roles and literary constructs of early Christian women as evidenced in the New Testament, patristic, and Apocryphal writings. Also considers the significance of those textual traditions for later Western ideas about women's social roles, including traditional and feminist theories. Cross-listed with RLST 163. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 164/ ANTH 164/ LNST 164. Gender and Development in Latin America (4)
Seminar, 3 hours; outside research, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Discusses the role and contribution of Latin American and Caribbean women within their societies. The effects of national economic development policies upon their status and their participation in and integration into the policy-making process are emphasized. Cross-listed with ANTH 164 and LNST 164. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 166/ MCS 127. Chicana/o Cultural Studies and Gender (4)
Politics (4) Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 1 hour; extra reading, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour.
Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the field of Chicana/o cultural studies and investigates the gender politics that attest to its intersectional approach. Considers how power and gendered politics have impacted the restructuring of the split subject in Chicana/o cultural studies. Cross-listed with MCS 127. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 168. Gender and Power in Muslim Societies (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; written work, 2 hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the dynamics of gender relations within the context of the Muslim world. Analyzes processes of power which influence concepts of femininity, masculinity, and the body and sexuality. Explores heterogeneity of the Muslim world, as well as its unifying cultural and social history. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 176. Gender, Human Rights, and Transnationalism (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 2 hours; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Explores dynamics of gender and power in human rights activism. Examines the history and evolution of human rights discourse, discourses of liberation, and critical responses to the strategy of framing women's rights as human rights in a comparative, transnational framework. Fulfills the Humanities requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 185/ ANTH 143. Gender, Race, and Medicine (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; written work, 1 hour; extra reading, 1 hour; individual study, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Explores the relationship between Western medicine and women, racial minorities, and non-Western citizens. Investigates how gender ideology, racial inequity, and colonialism shape the medical representation of bodies, sexuality, and pathology. Examines how patients have renegotiated their relationships with medicine through health movements and alternative healing practices. Cross-listed with ANTH 143. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.

WMST 186. Gender, Power, and Shifting Identities (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 1 hour; term paper, 1 hour; written work, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Explores constructions of various identities (racialized, gendered, sexual, diasporic) in cross-cultural contexts. Examines contemporary issues and theorizations concerning the intersection and politics of race, gender, and identity. Fulfills the Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

WMST 187. Women, Gender, and Technology (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; extra reading, 2 hours; term paper, 1 hour. Prerequisite(s): WMST 001. Introduces historical and sociological studies of gender and technology. Examines how women have been affected by technological developments and how gender ideologies informed the design and implementation of various technologies. Explores the relations among technology, material culture, sustainability, and power. Technologies covered include those in the household, the workplace, and cyberspace. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but
not both.

WMST 189. Gender, Technology, and the Body (4)
Lecture, 3 hours; individual study, 3 hours. Prerequisite(s): LGBS 001 or WMST 001. Examines various technologies that alter our bodies and investigates how technological interventions in the body reproduce and reshape gender ideologies in contemporary Western culture. Explores theoretical approaches to feminism, body, and technology. Topics include cosmetic, sex-reassignment, and weight loss surgeries; reproductive, contraceptive, and medical technologies; anti-depressants; sex toys; and body piercing. Cross-listed with LGBS 189. Fulfills either the Humanities or Social Sciences requirement for the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but not both.